"A Johns Hopkins scientist has issued a blistering report on influenza vaccines in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Peter Doshi, Ph.D., charges that although the vaccines are being pushed on the public in unprecedented numbers, they are less effective and cause more side effects than alleged by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Further, says Doshi, the studies that underlie the CDC’s policy of encouraging most people to get a yearly flu shot are often low quality studies that do not substantiate the official claims.

[…]

“The vaccine may be less beneficial and less safe than has been claimed, and the threat of influenza seems to be overstated,” Doshi says. Mandatory vaccination polices have been enacted, often in healthcare facilities, forcing some people to take the vaccine under threat of losing their jobs.”

hipsterlibertarian

hipsterlibertarian:

These criteria have been kept very hush-hush, which has been especially problematic for people who are put on the no-fly list and never even told why. Now that Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept has gotten this info, it’s exactly as awful and overbroad as you’d expect. I definitely recommend clicking through to read the whole article (or even the whole 166-page document if you’re more hardcore than I am this morning).

The Obama administration has quietly approved a substantial expansion of the terrorist watchlist system, authorizing a secret process that requires neither “concrete facts” nor “irrefutable evidence” to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist, according to a key government document obtained by The Intercept.

The “March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance,” a 166-page document issued last year by the National Counterterrorism Center, spells out the government’s secret rules for putting individuals on its main terrorist database, as well as the no fly list and the selectee list, which triggers enhanced screening at airports and border crossings.

The new guidelines allow individuals to be designated as representatives of terror organizations without any evidence they are actually connected to such organizations, and it gives a single White House official the unilateral authority to place entire “categories” of people the government is tracking onto the no fly and selectee lists. It broadens the authority of government officials to “nominate” people to the watchlists based on what is vaguely described as “fragmentary information.” It also allows for dead people to be watchlisted.

The Most Transparent Administration Ever.

An important thing to ask with news like this: you might trust Obama with this power, but would you trust Bush? Can you believe with confidence that you’ll trust every administration from here on out with this power and power like it?

I believe like a child that suffering will be healed and made up for, that all the humiliating absurdity of human contradictions will vanish like a pitiful mirage, like the despicable fabrication of the impotent and infinitely small Euclidean mind of man, that in the world’s finale, at the moment of eternal harmony, something so precious will come to pass that it will suffice for all hearts, for the comforting of all resentments, for the atonement of all the crimes of humanity, for all the blood that they’ve shed; that it will make it not only possible to forgive but to justify all that has happened.
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov
modfarm
modfarm:

Can’t Can Another Tomato? Then Trade It for Your Next Dinner Out.
What if you could barter your extra garden veggies for a nice restaurant dinner?

Oh man. Love this concept. Not that bartering is a new thing, or even close to mainstream, but I’d love to see an exchange like this fuel an influx of healthier food in restaurants that wouldn’t serve it otherwise because of cost, access, or other difficult factors.

“People like to share what they grow — there’s just no question about that,” says Chappell. “This is just a more formalized way of doing it and giving them something in return.”
And the enthusiasm came full circle when diners began tasting the fruits of their neighbors’ labor.

‘People like to share what they grow — there’s just no question about that,’ says Matt Chappell.

“What really struck me from a customer standpoint was how much they really liked the idea, embraced it, thought it was unique,” says Chappell. “It’s brought in new customers, and it’s made existing ones more interested in what we’re doing.” There’s certainly no underselling the pride in seeing your own haul make it onto the plate; as one customer put it to local TV station WCHW, “I like to come in and see if my stuff is on the menu.”

modfarm:

Can’t Can Another Tomato? Then Trade It for Your Next Dinner Out.

What if you could barter your extra garden veggies for a nice restaurant dinner?

Oh man. Love this concept. Not that bartering is a new thing, or even close to mainstream, but I’d love to see an exchange like this fuel an influx of healthier food in restaurants that wouldn’t serve it otherwise because of cost, access, or other difficult factors.

“People like to share what they grow — there’s just no question about that,” says Chappell. “This is just a more formalized way of doing it and giving them something in return.”

And the enthusiasm came full circle when diners began tasting the fruits of their neighbors’ labor.

‘People like to share what they grow — there’s just no question about that,’ says Matt Chappell.

“What really struck me from a customer standpoint was how much they really liked the idea, embraced it, thought it was unique,” says Chappell. “It’s brought in new customers, and it’s made existing ones more interested in what we’re doing.” There’s certainly no underselling the pride in seeing your own haul make it onto the plate; as one customer put it to local TV station WCHW, “I like to come in and see if my stuff is on the menu.”

nationalpostsports

nationalpostsports:

The Kansas City Royals (and Paul Rudd) celebrate winning the pennant.

James Shields led thousands of fans in a celebratory chant. Lorenzo Cain pranced along the warning track, cradling his newborn son. Ned Yost finally allowed himself to smile.

After nearly three decades spent as one of the game’s biggest laughingstocks, the Kansas City Royals are once again baseball royalty. They are headed to their first World Series since 1985, finishing a four-game sweep in the AL Championship Series with a 2-1 victory Wednesday over the Baltimore Orioles.

In a perfect post-season, the Royals are intent to relish every moment.

“It’s hard to explain,” said Cain, whose clutch hits and dramatic catches earned him the series MVP award. “We’re clicking at the right moment right now.”

There’s no doubt about that. (Photos: Ed Zurga/Getty Images, Jamie Squire/Getty Images, Charlie Riedel/The Associated Press)

popmech

Now, this is arguably the Waterloo for the concept of the big bundle, the telecom industry’s cash cow that lumps together expensive cable packages with limited choices and often ties them to Internet and home phone service. One study believes that if cable subscribers were allowed to choose their stations one by one, or even in smaller groups, the telecoms would lose $70 billion of revenue (about 50 percent of the industry) in a year.

HBO just took the first step toward that new reality.

npr

npr:

skunkbear:

All those little lines are jokes! ALL THE JOKES! (at least the ones I noticed)

Last year Jeremy Bowers, Danny DeBelius, Christopher Groskopf, Aly Hurt and I made a very silly interactive graphic exhaustively tabulating the running jokes in Arrested Development, along with their connections:

http://apps.npr.org/arrested-development/

And wouldn’t you know it, someone just put in a book — giving me an excuse to put in on tumblr. So if you’d like to see how many times GOB says “I’ve made a huge mistake,” check out the graphic.

I’ve made a huge mistake. And my mistake is not seeing this infographic until now. -Kate

I need to go back and watch this. So good.